The CPx is Supersoco’s flagship electric scooter that is currently selling in big numbers across the UK.

Packing dimensions similar to a maxi-scooter, and with performance comparable to a 125cc, the CPx is really putting itself in the market as a go-to electric option that could compete against its petrol counterparts. But does the CPx have enough spark to stand out in a crowd?

Looks

Rolled out in its black stealth-like colourway, with red striping, I think the CPx has a great look. With a front dual-LED headlight, matching side panels and exposed framework, the styling is modern and attractive.

The CPx offers a nice bit of stability too, with a 16” front wheel and a 14” rear wheel. Throw that in with a large-fixed windscreen for practicality along with that remarkably large-padded seat, and not only does the CPx look pretty decent but it’s also a very well-prepared commuter scooter!

That padded seat comes in at 760mm high, which is a good height, however, the seat is on the wide side, so those shorter amongst us (such as myself) might struggle to get both feet flat on the floor so, this is something to be wary of.

Besides the black, the CPx is also available in a grey and silver colourway.

Motor

Tucked away in the rear wheel is the hub motor that produces 4kW of power and peaks at 4.8kW. Now the stats of this are 5.4bhp and 46.5nm of torque, though I wouldn’t get too excited about that torque figure.

The CPx has 3 standard forward riding modes –Eco which will attain a speed of around 27, Normal will reach 41mph and Sport which will get to a mighty top speed of 56mph. The CPx also has a reverse function, though frustratingly you do have to hold the button in on the right of the switchgear and pull the throttle back at the same time. I would have preferred to simply tap that button once to engage reverse, and then once more to return to your normal rider mode, as opposed to holding the button down.

Now after you release the reverse mode, you’ll see on the display that rider mode has changed from ‘R’ for reverse to ‘F’. ‘F’ isn’t a riding mode for the road, it is in fact a forward mode suitable for a  walking pace or moving about. So to get back to your desired forward riding mode, simply double-tap the reverse button quickly and you’ll see it change from ‘F’ to the numbered mode you have selected and away you go! Slightly alien to start with but you soon get used to this quirky characteristic.

Battery

Available in either a single or dual battery option the CPx’s individual batteries are 60v/45ah which have a stated range of up to 44 miles each. The batteries themselves can either be removed from their home under the seat to charge (this will have to be done individually) or, alternatively, you can charge both batteries by plugging in the power lead to the port at the front of the seat.

Charging time takes around 3-4 hours per battery. The range the batteries will do depends on the average speed, weather and conditions it’s ridden in, though I think it is fair to say the range will be closer to 60 miles for the two-battery option rather than the 80, again it depends on many different factors.

It is worth saying that the difference between the single and dual battery versions is purely the range. Going for a single battery will not affect the top speed which is the downside to some rival models on the market. The CPx will still reach the top speed of 56mph, it will just have the range of one battery which will be 44 miles max.

Storage

As standard, there isn’t a whole lot of storage. Under that seat, the typical storage space is taken up by the two large batteries. There is a cover/shelf on top of the batteries so you can store a few small items but that really is it.  

To the rear of the leg shield, there is a small open cubby hole, which is good for a few small items but does not have a door so they will be exposed.

Although the standard storage is lacking, thanks to the CPx’s large size and rear rack, adding a top box is nice and easy. Not to stop there, but the CPX is hugely popular with delivery companies due to its ability to take a large cargo box, so this is definitely something to bear in mind.

Equipment

Around the dash and handlebars, everything becomes a bit too exposed for my liking. Like most large scooters I was expecting a plastic section surrounding the dash and covering the handlebars and wiring but with the CPx, Supersoco has done things differently, meaning the black metal handlebars, visible wires, and large centre digital dash are all uncovered.

The dash itself is large, clear and simply laid out with all the information you need such as speedometer, battery management, range, temperature, clock and rider mode without it looking messy or crowded. Then below the dash is your typical warning lights. When the word ‘READY’ is lit up in green you know pulling back on the throttle means business and away you go! Hitting the kill switch on the right of the switchgear, will take it off ‘Ready’ and will prevent it from accelerating.

The switchgear is all pretty standard stuff but works as you’d expect. And high up on the leg shield just above the cubbyhole is a USB charging port.

The CPx also has keyless technology, though you will need to insert the key to lock and unlock the steering lock, it works perfectly well when the key is removed from the barrel and kept on your person whilst riding.

Brakes and Suspension

Braking on the CPx is provided by a single brake disc to the front and another to the rear. This is then backed up by a combined braking system (CBS), so squeeze on the rear and the front brake is activated slightly as well.

The brakes perform well, though you do notice resistance quite early on pulling the levers with little braking. I pulled past this and was able to get the desired braking I was after, though with CBS do be aware you can lock those wheels, so be careful.

Suspension is quite standard stuff for a city commuter, with front telescopic forks and a rear monoshock.

Price

When it comes to price all three colourways options are the same, the main difference will be the single or dual battery variant and the use of a grant.

The single battery CPx starts from £3,599 (with UK grant applied) or £4,498.75 without.

The dual battery version will cost £4,699 (with UK grant applied) or £5,873.75 without. For this price, the vehicle has a 2-year vehicle and 3-year battery and motor warranty.

On the road

Hitting the road you are greeted with a large comfy seat and a nice and neutral seating position, with the handlebars feeling well positioned though feet room is a little snug. I think a slightly raised footrest on the rear of the leg shield would have been a great option but alas the standard floor plate should be sufficient for most, albeit just on the tight side. Overall, the CPx feels like a well-sized machine, not too dissimilar from a maxi-scooter.

I was concerned about the large windscreen and the edge of it being potentially annoying in the eye line. However, the screen is well placed. Get those wheels rolling and it does a really good job of keeping the worst of the wind and bad weather from ruining your day.

With that 16” front and 14” rear wheel, along with the 140-ish kg weight with two batteries, the CPx is one stable and well-balanced machine that holds the roads very nicely. The weight of the scooter is still easily manageable, and if manual handling is a bit much for some people, then you have the ‘Reverse’ and ‘Forward’ modes to make life easier.

Acceleration isn’t blistering and will steadily reach 40/45mph but going beyond this to the highs of around 56mph will take quite a while and a decent stretch of road. The more the battery drains the less you can expect on acceleration and top speed so that is something else to be aware of.

For me, with its lack of pace and limited top speed, this really is a scooter best suited for slower urban roads and not much more, though that is what its primary design is for so that shouldn’t come as a surprise. Nonetheless, it is still handy to have a scooter that can get to 50+mph if you do have the odd wander on faster roads.

Suspension follows the typical scooter setup and should handle town roads absolutely fine. Hit a rougher patch and the suspension does feel a tad firmer, however, the seat remains nice and comfortable. In addition, its relatively large size gives good visibility making it easy to see on the road.

The switchgear is a tad basic, but everything worked as it should. The large dash displays all the vital information clearly. Flicking through the rider modes is simple and you soon get used to how the ‘Reverse’ and ‘Forward’ modes operate. Battery management could be a tad better, showing 100% battery life until you go onto your second battery isn’t the clearest of systems, but something you’d soon get used to. When it comes to charging, I’d definitely recommend keeping those batteries topped up as often as possible – it isn’t best practice to exhaust them completely either.

Putting plenty of miles on the clock and zapping plenty of juice from the batteries on a long journey will have you noticing a reduction in top speed and acceleration, especially when you have less than 40% battery power left. I dare say that most people won’t be doing as long a journey as I did on the test so, for quick jaunts around town, you’ll be absolutely fine.

Summary

The Supersoco CPx is a well-equipped and spec’d electric scooter that offers good size and comfort. With a decent range of up to 80miles (I think it is more likely 60 miles in the real world) and a top speed of up to 56mph, it is helping push electric as a more viable option for people, though I would definitely keep this more restrained to the urban jungle.

There were some aspects I felt could be improved such as the firm suspension, lack of standard storage, battery life and limited foot room. However, there is simply no denying the CPx is a great and a very viable option for people wanting to go green.

As already mentioned, it is almost a maxi-scooter in size and stability and has a very respectable spec and range for a modern electric scooter. It carries a rather premium price tag as most electric offerings do currently thanks to those expensive batteries, however, throw in the negligible maintenance costs and the pennies to charge up and the CPx is one frugal machine to run so plenty of money will be recouped here.

If you are wanting a green electric scooter, with good size, range and spec, then the CPx really puts itself centre of attention. 

Supersoco CPx Specifications
Model CPx 4kW Patent Motor
Motor 4kW Patent Motor
Max speed 56 mph
Battery 2 x Lithium Ion ATL pouch cell batteries
Brakes Front and rear single disc
Suspension Front telescopic forks and rear monoshock
Seat height 760mm
Weight 107kg (excluding battery)
Warranty 2-years vehicle and 3-years battery and motor
Price With OLEV Grant – £3,599 (Single Battery),£4,699 (Dual Battery)

Without OLEV Grant – £4,498.75 (Single Battery), £5,873.75 (Dual Battery)

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