On your marks, get set, Scram! Royal Enfield is joining the ADV crossover market with an affordable A2-friendly retro Scrambler that’s built for the best of both off-road and urban riding.

With the new Scram 411 hitting the market in May, we’ve put together the 7 most important things you need to know about Royal Enfield’s newest offering.   

1.

Old dog, new tricks

The Scram 411 takes all its inspiration from Royal Enfield’s trusty, budget-friendly adventure bike, the Himalayan. When I say, ‘takes inspiration’, I mean brings the best of its components and uses it to present itself as a brand new Scrambler that uses the Himalayan’s adventurous setup as a foundation. This includes the engine, Harris-designed chassis and suspension.

2.

Styling

It’s been derived from the brand’s Himalayan so whilst the Scram 411 has so much in common with its much-loved sibling, such as its off-road-oriented style, there are going to be some clear differences too.

The clue is in the name here, the Scram 411 is set to bring a whole lot of Scrambler styling to the table. That’s quite unique itself though as in this 400cc category of motorcycle, we don’t often see a lot of scramblers.

Alongside that, in true Royal Enfield style, it also brings a vast selection of fruity new colourways including ‘Graphite Blue’, ‘Graphite Red’, ‘Graphite Yellow’, ‘Blazing Red’, ‘Skyline Blue’, ‘White Flame’ and ‘Silver Spirit’. I quite like the look of the ‘Skyline Blue’ and ‘Silver Spirit’. Both are classically handsome with bright and eye-catching pops of colour.

3.

Engine

As just mentioned, the Scram’s 411cc air-cooled single isn’t new so you’ll be familiar with its simplistic nature, 24hp performance and 23.6 of torque at 4250rpm. As with most Royal Enfield’s, if you want outright power and crazy performance then this model won't be for you!

4.

Chassis

One key difference you will notice about the Scram’s chassis is that the fairing and high mudguard, as seen on the Himalayan, have both gone. In their place, we see the Scram favour a more stripped down and bare appearance.

In addition to this, at 190mm instead of 200mm, we’re seeing slightly less long-travel suspension on this model.

At 795mm compared to the 800mm of the Himalayan, the Scram 411 will also have a slightly lower seat height – that’s thanks to the smaller wheels which we are moving onto next.

5.

Wheels and brakes

So onto the wheels now and to help with the more road-oriented style and handling of the Scram, we see it switching from the Himalayan’s 21-inch front wheel to a 19-inch of its own.

It then keeps the same 300mm front disc and 240mm rear disc brake as the Himalayan, as well as the dual-channel ABS.

6.

Comfort

As the fuel tanks on adventure bikes are usually equipped for longer stints, comfort is key. In the Scram 411’s case, its 15L fuel tank will see around 290 miles so a new seat to increase comfort and time spent in the saddle was important.

7.

On and off road capabilities

The Scram 411 is a multi-purpose tool that’s simple and distinct in its design. It knows its purpose and with a light overall weight, sharp sense of versatility, comfortable ergonomics and agile nature, that purpose is as an ADV crossover that’s built with a unique combination of on-road and trail capabilities.

Mark Wells, Chief of Design at Royal Enfield sums it up himself by saying “we were determined to create a motorcycle that would be distinct in design and purpose and bring the best of rough-road capability to urban riding. With its distinctive look and design, playful colourways, accessible riding proposition, the Scram 411 is an ultimate ADV crossover for the urban environment.”

The last stop

Royal Enfield aren’t just calling the Scram 411 a crossover bike, they’re branding it a ‘subspecies’. We’ll have to see how this species fairs when up against some of the biggest names in the business.

It’s set to hit dealers in May but my question to you is do you think it can it take the lead? You’ll have to let me know what you think in the comments below!

Spec

Engine 411cc, 24.3 bhp, air-cooled
Fuel tank 15L
Brakes Front: 300m disc, 2-piston floating caliper
Rear: 240mm disc, single-piston floating caliper
Suspension Front: Telescopic, 41mm forks, 190mm travel
Rear: Monoshock with linkage, V180mm, wheel travel
Seat height 795mm
Weight 185kg
Price £4,599